A helpful look at Georgia’s priorities

My friend, and former AJC reporter/editor Tom Baxter has a great column discussing the difference in how Georgia’s political leaders think about spending money on a project like deepening the Port of Savannah versus expanding the Medicaid program to cover an additional 650,000 uninsured Georgians. It’s on the Saporta Report website. The standard brush off line that the governor’s office gives to reporters asking about why Georgia won’t take advantage of Obamacare’s offer to pay the full cost of the expansion for the first three years and at least 90 percent of the costs after that is “the state can’t afford it.” Georgia has a $20 billion annual budget. The “cost” to the state to expand Medicaid would run about $200 million a year. Do the math. It ain’t much. But can we afford a lot more than that to expand the port? Sure we can. An expanded port provides jobs, right? (Well, hopefully, although the promised benefit is pretty much a best, most optimistic guess.) Whereas the Medicaid expansion results in more Georgians being covered, a revitalized health care sector and, more than likely saved lives that might actually help the state improve its dismal health rankings. We could probably afford to do both. But you won’t hear that from the state’s leaders. It’s a matter of priority. What Nathan Deal and Ralph Hudgens mean to say about the Medicaid expansion is not that “the state can’t afford it,” it’s that we don’t think its worth spending any more money on poor people. They ought to at least be honest about that.

Here’s the link to Tom’s column.

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